Cardiovascular & Thermal Physiology Laboratory

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The Cardiovascular and Thermal Physiology Laboratory is approximately 500 sq. ft. and is equipped with state-of-the-art techniques, including laser-Doppler flowmetry to measure skin blood flow; microdialysis for the local delivery of pharmacological agents to the skin; local skin heaters; water-perfused suits to regulate and change body temperature; and wireless telemetry pills to measure core body temperature.


Research in the Cardiovascular & Thermal Physiology Laboratory is broadly centered on understanding the physiological mechanisms that allow for large increases in skin blood flow (cutaneous vasodilation) in humans. The specific aims of the laboratory are threefold: (1) understanding the cutaneous vasodilation in response to heat stress, (2) understanding the cutaneous vasodilation in response to locally applied heat to an area of skin about the size of a dime, and (3) using the cutaneous vasculature to assess vascular health and function in health and disease.

Techniques and equipment used in the laboratory include:

  • Laser-Doppler flowmetry
  • Local skin heaters
  • Intradermal microdialysis
  • Water-perfused suits for whole body heat stress

If you are interested in being a participant in a current research project, please contact Dr. Brett Wong via email at bwong@gsu.edu or via phone at 404-413-8133.

If you are an undergraduate student or potential graduate student and would like more information about the lab, please contact Dr. Brett Wong via email at bwong@gsu.edu or via phone at 404-413-8133.


The Cardiovascular & Thermal Physiology Laboratory is always seeking potential participants to take part in research studies. Current research projects include:

The Effect of a High Fat Meal on Human Microvascular Function (Georgia State IRB Approval #H14261)

Purpose: We are trying to better understand how a high fat meal affects the health and function of the blood vessels (microvasculature). Impaired microvascular health and function may lead to diseases such as diabetes and hypertension. We also want to determine if a mild heat stress can reduce the harmful effects of a high fat meal on microvascular function. Lastly, we want to understand how race/ethnicity affects microvascular health and function following a high fat meal. Hispanic Americans and African Americans tend to have higher rates of diseases, such as diabetes and hypertension, so we want to determine if there are differences in how Hispanic Americans, African Americans, and Caucasian Americans react to a high fat meal.

If you are interested in being a participant in this project, please contact Dr. Brett Wong (bwong@gsu.edu or 404-413-8133) or Ms. Jennifer Harvey (jharvey10@student.gsu.edu) for more information.